Types of Church School

Voluntary Controlled (VC) Schools

There are approximately 1997 VC schools, of which all but 20 are primary schools. VC schools are 'managed' by the LA whilst maintaining their distinctive characteristics.

The key characteristics of a VC school are:

  • The LA employs the staff, but they are appointed by the governors
  • The LA is responsible for admissions arrangements
  • The LA can advise the governing body; the DDE may be given the same opportunity to advise
  • RE taught is the LA agreed syllabus and worship reflects the Anglican tradition
  • No one group of governors is in a majority. Church or Foundation governors are in a minority

Voluntary Aided (VA) Schools

There are 1,706 VA schools, comprised of 1,649 Primary schools, 53 Secondary schools and four All Through schools. VA schools are required to contribute to capital funding in return for more autonomy for the Church.

The key characteristics of a VA school are:

  • The Church or Foundation governors are an absolute majority
  • The governors appoint and employ all staff
  • Governors are responsible for admissions arrangements, approved by the 'religious authority' as defined in the Admissions Code
  • The LA and the DDE have similar rights to attend governors meetings and to advise
  • Governors determine the RE syllabus which should reflect the Anglican tradition and worship reflects the Anglican tradition

Foundation Schools

28 Church schools became grant maintained and are now Foundation Schools. In these schools:

  • No one group of governors is in a majority. Church or Foundation governors are in a minority
  • The governors appoint and employ all staff
  • Governors are responsible for admissions arrangements, approved by the 'religious authority' as defined in the Admissions Code
  • The LA can advise the governing body: the DDE may be given the same opportunity to advise
  • RE taught is the LA agreed syllabus and worship reflects the Anglican tradition

Sponsored Academies

Sponsored academies state funded independent schools with considerable powers of self-determination. They are usually set up to replace under-performing schools with the aim of improving educational standards. The CofE, through the dioceses, is either sponsor, co-sponsor or a key partner in academies located in areas of considerable deprivation. The academies are key part of the Church's mission to those communities in need of regeneration and they provide beacons of hope and success. There are 250 'sponsored' Church of England academies, 42 of which are secondary academies.

Converter Academies

Outstanding schools and schools ranked good with outstanding features by Ofsted can now become academies. All other schools will also be eligible, providing they work in partnership with a high-performing school that will help drive improvement. These do not require a sponsor but enjoy the same freedoms as other academies. The religious designation and other key characteristics (such as the admissions policy) remain. Church schools wishing to convert must have the approval of the trustees - usually the Diocesan Board of Education. There are 656 'converter' Church of England academies, 88 of which are secondary academies.

There are also 14 open free schools, which are newly opened academies.

Affiliated Schools

Many dioceses run schemes whereby schools can affiliate to and enjoy the benefits of being part of the Church school family.

Independent schools

There are over 200 independent schools designated as having a Church of England or Anglican character.

 

These figures were accurate at February 2017.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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